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White Pitts

White PittsWhite Pitts is an example of how a field or feature may have been used as the name of a farm that has been retained long after the farm ceased to exists as a separate entity.  The extract from the 1794 map shows where White Pitts is recorded in the 1840 tithe  and the large white spot identifies the approximate location of where a large pit is shown in the 1840 map and an still be seen in the ground today.  It is possible there were several ‘White Pitts’ and the name shares a common source with Marle Close and Whitemead.
John Curtis was listed as the first person paying rates for White Pitts in 1701 according to the 18th century churchwarden accounts poor law records. He may have been living in Sages Farm at the time. Francis Palmers was paying rates for White Pitts and Whyches by 1730 which suggests they were combined as one farm.  White Pitts was sometimes described as being in the West End tithing and on other occasions it was listed under Middlesex.
 William Wright was paying rates for White Pitt by 1750 but he was the Waldegrave  estate manager so he was responsible for several properties at various times.
The field marked House is the site of the modern Bathway Farm and was previously a  Kingsmills property. White Pitts is roughly half way between Bathway and Nedge.
 Rouse Corner  can be seen on the right and the The Gore is a possible as an alternative name for a farm that may have been in this area or near Emborough.
The Hunt family were paying rates in the area and they were both agents for the Kingsmills and  vicars of Chewton Mendip.
 Nobels , Coombs , Clarks , Sperrings Lane and Kingswell   are a number of farms that may have been based near by or incorporated White Pitts at one time.
 The Turnpike road built in 1754 may have created a new division between the  West End and East End or Middlesex tithings which may explain the multiple records for White Pitts.
  Uriah Ferris was paying tithes for White Pitts in 1840.
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